AUSTRALIAN RADIOS

(partial list of Australian made military and commercial radios)


1

Tele Box Term Sig OF, Used by the Army. in 1946.

1

Tele Frames DP, 10 wire. Used by the Army. in 1946.

1

Cable Lay Frames. Used by the Army. in 1946.

1

Aerial Tuning Plate for Wireless Set Number 62, Used by the Army. in 1956.

1

Muzzle Velocity Detector. See Chronometers, Photocell (Aust) No 1

1

Morse key, Indent List Keys telegraph Light weight Aust # 1. Used by the Army in 1956.

1

Transmitter receiver. Called the Teleradio 1. Made by A.W.A. in 1935. This was a basic tunable transmitter with a tunable receiver side by side in a rectangular steel box, operated from batteries or a pedal generator based on a bicycle frame. The tuning dials were typical of the 1930's era of receivers with a round black bakelite housing which had a small knob at the bottom to operate the reduction drive and a window at the top to view the tuning scale. There was a demand for at least 200 Teleradios for fixed and portable installations and AWA set up base stations in major towns and islands to provide wireless links between stations and back to Australia. The operators and technicians were AWA employees. (from Colin MacKinnon). This was the first Coast Watcher radio, which developed into the Teleradio 3A, 3B and then the Teleradio 3BZ. (picture)

1 Mark 3

Signal Generator ZDA061. Used by the Army in 1953. Made by Ratcliffe Eastwood.

1 Mark 1/1

Power Supply for Wireless Set Number 19. Used by the Army in 1954 EMEI F252

1A

Power Supply for WS No. 22. Made by Radio Corp.

1A Mark 2

Power Supply for WS No. 122.

2

Transmitter receiver. Called the Teleradio 2. Made by A.W.A. This was the second Coast Watcher radio, which developed into the Teleradio 3A then 3B and then the Teleradio 3BZ. (picture) (inside) (namplate)

2

Switchboard Tele Magneto 10 line number 2. Used by the Army in 1946.

2

Switchboard Magneto. 10 line YAA3610. Made by Eclipse Radio in 1945.

2 Mark 2

Telephone Lightweight. Produced after the L phone in 1946.

2 Mark 3

Mine Detector. Used by the Army in 1954.

3A

Transmitter receiver. Called the Teleradio 3A. The receiver and transmitter/tuning unit of the 3A version were separate items, fitted into two rectangular steel boxes. The receiver (AWA Type *C3487) had a straight line dial covering from 105 meters (2.9 Mhz) to 13 meters (23 Mhz) in two bands plus an LF/MF segment in a third band. There were three models to cover different sections of the LF/MF band between 100-1500 Khz, identified by replacing the "*" with a 4, 5, or 6. The valve lineup of the receiver was a 1C4 RF amplifier, 1C6 oscillator/mixer, 1C4 IF, 1K6 detector/AVC/AF, 1D4 audio output and a 1K4 BFO. The general design for the 3A receiver was based on the newly introduced AWA dual band domestic receivers which featured straight line dials. The transmitter (Type J3908) was a simple unit fitted in another steel case, about the same size as the receiver case. The valves used were a 42 as the crystal oscillator, another 42 as the speech amplifier, driving a 6A6 as the class B modulator. The RF amplifier was an 807. (from Colin MacKinnon). Made by A.W.A. in 1940. This Coast Watcher radio, was developed into the Teleradio 3B and then the Teleradio 3BZ. (picture)

3B

Transmitter receiver. Called the Teleradio 3B, developed from the Teleradio 3A. Used the C6770 receiver (180 degree vernier dial), the J6798 transmitter, D6799 speaker/power supply, and J6847 aerial coupler. Constructed in rugged steel boxes with rounded corners, and clip on front covers for protection when being manhandled through jungle. Frequency coverage 3 - 9 mcs. Used by coast watchers. Made by A.W.A. in 1941. Developed into the Teleradio 3BZ. (picture)

3BZ

Transmitter receiver. Called the Teleradio 3BZ developed from the Teleradio 3B. Consists of the C6770 receiver (180 degree vernier dial), J50062 transmitter (including 6 crystals) and D13503 speaker. Receiver and transmitter had internal vibrator power supplies. Sometimes just the transmitter is called the 3BZ. Frequency coverage 2.5 - 10 mcs. Constructed in rugged steel boxes with rounded corners, and clip on front covers for protection when being manhandled through jungle. Used by Coast Watchers. Made by A.W.A. in 1942. (picture)

4-SU-1A

Transmitter. Multi channel UHF. Used by the Postmaster Generals Department for telephone facilities between Tasmania and the mainland. Two tall racks. (picture)

4-SU-6A

Transmitter. R.A.N. version of the AT20.

5V15

Receiver. Frequency coverage 0.55 - 1.65 mcs, 6 - 18 mcs. Mains operated. Pickup input, external speaker output. Made by Stromberg Carlson in 1945. Amenities receiver used at Morotai. (picture)

10

Microphone and Headphones. Used by the Army in 1944.

10 WATT AERIAL MOBILE TRANSMITTER

Transmitter. See type J3244.

14

Teletype Distributor. Used by the APO in 1958.

14S

Transmitter. Power output 400 watts RT, MCW, CW. Voice Operated Carrier. Provision for preselection of 10 "spot" frequencies. Eight other variants. Used by R.A.A.F. Frequency 140-550 kcs, 2-20 mcs. Made by S.T.C. (picture)

60A

Transceiver. See N61355.

179

Power Supply for training. Used by the R.A.A.F. in 1981.

200

Signal Generator. Made by Ratcliffe, Eastwood.

205

Signal Generator. 45 - 180 mcs. Made by Ratcliffe, Eastwood. (picture)

938SWB

Receiver. Early version of 941SWB. Made in New Zealand.

941SWB

Receiver. Uses a large National micrometer dial and tuning capacitor, 19" rack unit. Uses plug in coil boxes, 2.5 - 5, 5 - 10, 10 - 20 mcs. Made by Collier and Beal in New Zealand in 1941 for the New Zealand Post Office. Looks externally like a National HRO receiver.

941SWB2

Receiver. Same as 941SWB but with additional coil box covering 1.4 - 2.5 mcs.

16301

Transmitter. Frequency Range 330 - 550 kcs. Used by the R.A.N. in 1961. Part of "ACAS" system.

16302

Transmitter. Frequency Range 1.5 - 17 mcs. Used by the R.A.N. in 1961. Part of "ACAS" system.

16303

Receiver. Frequency Range 0.04 - 30 kcs. Used by the R.A.N. in 1961. Part of "ACAS" system.

16304

Power Supply. Used by the R.A.N. in 1961. Part of "ACAS" system.

A1

Artificial Aerial, Ident No Y10B/60025. Made by A.W.A. (picture) (picture)

A3

Artificial Aerial, Type Y50026, Ident No Y10B/60094, Frequency 2 - 20 Mcs. Used on AT5. Made by A.W.A. in 1943. (picture)

A4

Artificial Aerial, Ident No Y10B/60117, Type Y50025, Frequency 140 - 500 kcs. 50 watts. Used on AT5. Made by A.W.A. (picture) (picture)

A7

Test set. Same as R7490 signal generator. Used by the R.A.A.F.

A.12.S

Receiver. Precision D/F receiver used by R.A.A.F. Consisting of 4 modules in a short rack. The modules are the AR17 receiver, Power Supply Type N, Crystal Calibrator Type A2, and Remote Control Unit Type A11. (picture rack)   (picture AR17)

A18

Test set for air warning equipment. Made by the Gramophone Company (H.M.V.) (picture)

A20

Test set for SCR-522 transceiver made in 1945.

A58

Test Set for RADAR. Made by the Gramophone Company (H.M.V.) (picture)

A510

Transceiver. Frequency coverage 2 - 10 mcs. AM voice, CW, 4 crystal channels; output 0.5 W, battery operated. Backpack size, but consisting of 2 units mounted on the chest connected by a cable. Made by A.W.A. in 1953. (picture) (accessories) (Transmitter circuit) (Receiver circuit)

A618

Transmitter receiver LF/MF/HF ACAS made in 1961.

A661

Receiver. Frequency coverage 15 - 550 kcs, in 4 bands. A 10 valve superheterodyne with a 650 kcs IF, an additional 100 kcs IF was used for the lowest band. Used a 6U7G RF amp, two 6K8G mixers, two 6U7G IF amps, two 6B8G, 6J7G AF amp, 6J7G BFO, 5Z4G rectifier. Tuning knob has 20:1 and another tuning knob 120:1 reduction. Used by the R.A.N. and R.A.A.F. Made by S.T.C. in late 1930s. (picture)

A679

Receiver. Frequency coverage 1.5 - 24 mcs. Available in H version (for communications) or J versions (for D/F) or K version (US Army version). Operates from 12 vdc or 110/240 vac. Also used by the R.A.N. Made by S.T.C. in 1944. Also called the AMR300 when used by US forces. (picture)

A1045

Transceiver. (Eureka/Rebecca homing system for aircraft) Rebecca airborne interrogator, tropicalised, 6 channels, frequency 176, 214, 219, 224, 229, 234 mcs. Made by the Gramophone Co. in September 1945. (picture) (circuit)

A1047

Indicator. (Eureka/Rebecca homing system for aircraft) Rebecca airborne indicator, tropicalised CRT display. See A1045 for a circuit. Made by the Gramophone Co. in September 1945. (picture)

A1052

Transceiver. (Eureka/Rebecca homing system for aircraft) Eureka ground responder, tropicalised, 6 channels, frequency 176, 214, 219, 224, 229, 234 mcs. Made by the Gramophone Co. in September 1945. (front picture) (top picture) (circuit)

A2860

RADAR. Frequency 200 mcs. Made in 1943.

A8089

Crystal Calibrator. Generates harmonics of 1000kcs, 100kcs, 50kcs, switchable. Made by A.W.A. (circuit)     (power supply circuit)

A8407

Heterodyne Calibrator. Made by A.W.A. in 1943.

A8828

Frequency meter. Portable frequency meter, range 0 - 30 kcs. Input level 1 - 300 volts. Made by A.W.A. Described in A.W.A. Technical Review No. 5 1944 page 259. (picture)

A38484

Oscillator. Used for VSWR testing of 50 and 75 ohm aircraft aerials. Frequencies covered are 75 mcs (marker beacon), 100 - 150 mcs (VAR, VOR, and communications), 206 mcs (DME), 332 mcs (Glide Slope). Made by A.W.A. Described in A.W.A. Technical Review No. 2 1957 page 90. The model number may be in error. (picture)

A52742

Relay Test Unit. Used for adjusting Carpenter Relays used for teleprinters. Uses 240 Volts AC input. Made by A.W.A. in 1951. (circuit)

A56031

Oscilloscope. Made by A.W.A. in 1955.

A56048

Universal Bridge. Made by A.W.A. in 1955.

A56068

Distortion and Noise Meter. Made by A.W.A.

A57321

Low Distortion Audio Oscillator. Made by A.W.A.

A70542

Distortion and Noise Meter. Auto nulling, 10 hz to 100 khz. Made by A.W.A. in 1976. (circuit1)    (circuit2)    (circuit3)

A85327

Oscillator. Beat Frequency Oscillator for aircraft. Frequency range 0 - 5 kcs. Made by A.W.A. described in A.W.A. Technical Review No. 1 1946 page 27. The model number may be in error. (picture)

A96053

Oscilloscope. Made by A.W.A. 5" CRT. Described in the A.W.A. Technical Review No. 4 1947 page 403. (picture)   

A96060

Oscillator. Precision Beat Frequency Oscillator, range 0 - 20 kcs, made by A.W.A. Described in A.W.A. Technical Review No. 4 1947 page 393 (picture)

AA No.1 MK 2

RADAR. Frequency 200 mcs.

ACF

Receiver. Used in Borneo. Made by Philips Electrical Industries. (picture)

Aerial Coupling Unit "C"

Allows the WS No. 11 to be operated 30 feet from the aerial. Used by the Army in 1943. (picture)

Aerial Coupling Unit "J"

For the WS No. 22 or WS No. 122 to load rod aerials 12 to 34 feet long, and 45 feet from the transmitter. Made by Radio Corp. in 1946.

AEW1

Receiver. Amenities receiver made in New Zealand. (picture)

AEW2

Receiver. Amenities receiver for the American forces. Made in New Zealand in 1944 by Westco Products. Five valves, frequency coverage 550 to 1800kcs, 100v AC. (front)    (oblique)    (top)    (under)

AFSR-2

Frequency Shift Converter. This equipment was a dual diversity demodulator for frequency shifted radio teletype transmissions. It took the 455 KHz IF output from its two associated receivers, and after amplification converted each to a second IF frequency of 17KHz. After further amplification and limiting these two signals were combined and fed to a discriminator stage whose output was then processed by an electronic telegraph signal regenerator to remove bias distortion and then drove a Carpenter telegraph relay. Diversity switching was effected by paralleling the AGC lines in the receivers and in the AFSR-2, so that a stronger signal in one channel would suppress a weaker signal in the other. Automatic frequency control of the 472 KHz local oscillator was provided to counter possible frequency drift of the received signals, together with a built in oscilloscope displaying critical signals within the equipment. A total of 74 of these equipments were supplied by S.T.C Sydney in 1953/54. Used with receivers AR7A and AR21. Made by S.T.C.

AM5

Receiver. Dual wave, dual power. Amenities set used by the US forces. Made by Tasma. (picture)

AMA

Receiver. Radio used as an amenities receiver. 240 vac operation. Frequency coverage 550 to 1650 khz and 6 to 18 Mhz. IF is 455 khz. Valves are 6U7 RF, 6A8 Mixer, 6U7 IF, 6B6 det/agc/audio, 6V6 audio output, 5Y3 rectifier. Made in 1946 by Velco Sound Systems 490 Elizabeth St Melbourne phone F2194. (picture) (picture of top) (picture of under chassis)

AMENITIES

Receiver. Radio tuner/amplifier. Made by Velco Sound Systems of Melbourne. (picture)

AMR100

Receiver. Frequency Range 0.1 - 26 mcs, plug in coil boxes. Operates from 12vdc or 110/240vac. Made for the US forces by A.W.A. in 1943. A copy of the National HRO. (picture)

AMR101

Receiver. Rack mount version of the AMR100.

AMR200

Receiver. Made by Eclipse Radio. A copy of the Hammarlund. (picture) (picture inside) (power supply) (power supply rear)

AMR300

Receiver. Same as the A679J.

AMS110

Multi channel line amplifier made for the US forces by Transmission Products. (picture)

AMS-195

Power supply. US Army version of the Type V. See Type V.

AMT120

Transmitter. CW only. US Army version of the AT20. See AT20.

AMT125

Transmitter. CW and AM. Made for the US Army.

AMT150

Transmitter. US Army version of the AT21. See AT21.

AMT250

Transmitter. US Army version of the J3922. See J3922.

AR1

Receiver. Medium frequency coverage, aircraft use.

AR2

Receiver. Frequency coverage 4 - 15 mcs. Ground use.

AR3

Receiver. TRF type, frequency coverage 1500 - 4000 Kc. Valves used were a HF screen grid valve (no designation given) in the aerial circuit, a VR12F detector which fed a penthode (in those days not a pentode), audio amplifier (no designation given) via an LF type A transformer. Headphones were connected directly between plate and screen grid of the penthode. General purpose R.A.A.F. use.

AR4

Receiver. TRF type, frequency coverage 4 - 15 mcs. Valves used were a HF screen grid valve (no designation given) in the aerial circuit, a HF screen grid detector (no designation given) which directly fed a penthode audio amplifier (no designation given) via a coupling capacitor. Headphones were connected directly between plate and screen grid of the penthode. General purpose R.A.A.F. use.

AR5

Receiver. High frequency coverage. Ground use ("Butterbox")

AR6

Receiver. TRF type, low and medium frequency coverage, bandswitched, with BFO, AVC and 240v power supply. Uses seven valves, 6D6, 6A7, 6D6 (detector), 6C6 (BFO), 6B7 (audio amp), 6C6 (audio amp.), 80 (rectifier). Headphones or speaker were transformer coupled to the audio output stage. R.A.A.F. ground use ("Butterbox")

AR7

Receiver. General purpose communications receiver. Frequency 138 kcs - 25 mcs. I.F. 455kcs with crystal filter. Uses large micrometer dial, with 5 plug in coil boxes. Frequency readout from the chart on the coil box. Similar to the HRO. Used by the R.A.A.F. Made by Kingsley Radio Melbourne in 1942. Also known as the K/CR/11. (front) (coil boxes) (under) (rear) (circuit) (rack) There was a version made for the Dutch Navy that had a Dutch language front panel, and a Philips logo. (Dutch AR7)

AR7A

Receiver. Same as the AR7 but modified post war by the R.A.A.F. Separate BFO and AVC toggle switches. Cathode follower for connection of IF signal to FSK decoder. Suitable for Frequency Shift Keying reception for RTTY. (picture) (back)

AR8

Receiver. General purpose airborne receiver with D/F capability. Frequency coverage 140 - 740 kcs, and 765 kcs - 20 mcs. Two front ends, common I.F. of 755 kcs. Used by the R.A.A.F. with the AT5 transmitter. Made by A.W.A. in 1943 as the C7733. (picture)    (circuit)   (interwiring with AT5)

AR10

Receiver. Portable communications receiver. Used by the R.A.A.F. Used for artillery co-operation in the Middle East. Made by Radio Corporation. (picture)

AR12

Receiver. Communications receiver, dry battery operated. Frequency range 150 kcs to 15 mcs with a crystal filter and continuously variable selectivity. Used by the R.A.A.F. with the AT9 transmitter. Made by Radio Corporation. (picture)   (picture)

AR13

Receiver. Frequency coverage 150 - 300 kcs, and 3.5 - 7 mcs. Ground receiver for training use.

AR14

Receiver. TRF. Used by the R.A.A.F. Copy of the English R1082 receiver. Made by Radio Corporation. (picture)

AR17

Receiver. Super heterodyne VHF FM/AM frequency 100 - 150 mcs. Use by the R.A.A.F. with the AT17 transmitter. Developed and built by Radio Corporation Pty. Ltd. Used in Rack Assembly Type 12S for D/F. Uses type N power supply. (picture)

AR21

Receiver. Fixed frequency receiver, tuneable internally. Frequency range with plug in coils, 1.48 - 3.6 mcs, 3.5 - 7 mcs, 7 - 14 mcs, 14 - 26 mcs. Made by Thom and Smith. Also known as Reception Set TS100.

AR301

RADAR receiver. Frequency 200 mcs. Used with the AT300 transmitter. Made in 1943.

AS15

Transmitter. Frequency range 300 - 510 kcs (2 channels), 2.5 - 13 mcs (10 channels), telephony, CW and MCW, at 40 watts. Valves used 807 (osc), 807, 807 (PA), 6V6, 807, 807 (modulator). For civil aircraft, made to fit an ATR rack. Made by A.W.A. Described in A.W.A. Technical Review No. 8 1946 page 473. (picture)   (circuit)

AS16

Receiver. Frequency range 200 kcs - 13 mcs, in 10 channels remotely controlled. Valves used 6AC7, 6U7, 6U7 (RF amps), 6A8 (mixer), 6U7, 6U7 (IF amps), 6B8, 6J5, 6J5 (AF amps), 6A8 (BFO). For civil aircraft, made to fit an ATR rack. Made by A.W.A. Described in A.W.A. Technical Review No. 8 1946 page 489. (picture)

AT1

Transmitter. Cathode keyed CW only transmitter covering 1500 to 4000 Kc. Uses two VT5B valves. The transmitter included a 0-20v meter and rheostat for filament voltage, a 0-500ma meter for plate current and two 0.5amp RF ammeters, one in the antenna lead, the other in the counterpoise lead. The Power Supply was the Rectifier Type A (with a 0-3500v meter in the HT line) or Rectifier Type B (no meter). It used 2 VU7A rectifier tubes. It included a 0-20 volt meter and rheostat for filament voltage and a 0-500ma meter for HT current. Used by the R.A.A.F.

AT2

Transmitter. Airborne version of AT1.

AT3

Transmitter. Frequency coverage HF. Power output 6000 watts. Used by the R.A.A.F.

AT4

Transmitter. Frequency coverage HF. High Power. Used by the R.A.A.F.

AT5

Transmitter type J7731. Frequency coverage 140 - 500 kcs, 2 - 20 mcs. Power output 50 watts. Used by R.A.A.F. with the ATU type J7732, AR8 receiver type C7733, A3 and A4 artificial Aerial, Junction box R7735, and mounts. (picture) (picture of junction box) (picture of mounts)

AT6

Transmitter. Frequency coverage 3.5 - 7 mcs. Power output 200 watts. Used by the R.A.A.F.

AT7

Transmitter for ATR1.

AT8

Transmitter. Frequency coverage 3 - 20 mcs. Power output 500 watts. Used by the R.A.A.F. Made by S.T.C. (picture)

AT9

Transmitter. Frequency coverage 150 - 300 kcs, 3.5 - 8 mcs. Power output 300 watts. Portable. Used by the R.A.A.F.

AT10

Transmitter. Australian version of the English T1083. Used by the R.A.A.F.

AT11

Transmitter. Frequency coverage 3 - 15 mcs. Australian modified version of English T1087. Used by the R.A.A.F.

AT12

Transmitter for ATR2. Frequency coverage 3 - 7.5 mcs. Power output 15 watts. Used by the R.A.A.F.

AT13

Transmitter. Power output 500 watts CW. Frequency 2.5 -20 mcs. Used by R.A.A.F. for point to point communications. Five modules on a mount. Made by A.W.A. in 1944.

AT13A

Transmitter. Power output 500 watts CW. Frequency 150-600 kcs, 2.5 -20 mcs. Used by R.A.A.F. for point to point communications. Five modules on a mount. Made by A.W.A. in 1944.

AT13B

Transmitter. Mobile version of AT13. Used by R.A.A.F.

AT13C

Transmitter. Mobile version of AT13A. (picture).

AT14

Transmitter. Power output 100-200 watts. RT and CW. Voice Operated Carrier. Frequency 3-20 mcs. Used by the R.A.A.F. as a mobile and static ground station. Made by Thom and Smith Pty. Ltd. in 1943. Three modules in a rack. (picture)

AT14A

Transmitter. Same as AT14, but consists of four modules in two short racks, reduced weight and extended power input facilities, includes provision for 4 pre-selected operating frequencies. Mobile version of AT14. (picture)

AT15

Transmitter. Power output 350-500 watts. Frequency 130-500 kcs. Used by the R.A.A.F. for NDB.

AT15A

Transmitter. Power output 350-500 watts. Frequency 130-500 kcs. Used by the R.A.A.F. for "homing" and airport control. Five modules in two short racks, similar in appearance to the AT14A. Made by Thom and Smith Pty. Ltd. in 1944. Mobile version of AT15. (picture)

AT16

Transmitter. Power output 14000 watts. Frequency 3 - 20 mcs. Used by the R.A.A.F.

AT17

Transmitter. Power output 50-150 watts FM, AM. Frequency 100-150 mcs. Voice Operated Carrier. Used by the R.A.A.F. as a mobile and static ground station. Five modules in two short racks, similar in appearance to the AT14A. Made by Thom and Smith Pty. Ltd. in 1943. Receiver is the AR17. (picture)

AT18

Transmitter. Power output 20000 watts. Frequency 3 - 20 mcs. Used by the R.A.A.F.

AT19

Transmitter. Power output 500-1000 watts CW, MCW. Frequency 2.5-20 mcs. Used by the R.A.A.F. for static ground station service. One tall rack. Made by Kriesler (A/sia) Pty. Ltd. (picture)

AT-20

Transmitter. Power output 500 watts CW. Frequency 2-20 mcs. Used by the R.A.A.F. Counterpart to the AT13B. Five pre-selected frequencies. Six modules in two short racks, similar in appearance to the AT14A. Made by S.T.C. Also made by Eclipse Radio in Melbourne. (picture)   (exciter circuit)   (power amplifier circuit)   (LT circuit)   (HT circuit)   (cabinet circuit)   (cabinet wiring)   (transmitter cabinet circuit)

AT-20M

Transmitter. Same as the AT-20 but with AM. There is a high level modulator fitted to the bottom of the transmitter cabinet, replacing the lower panel. (modulator circuit)

AT21

Transmitter. Power output 15-50 watts RT, MCW, CW. Frequency 1.5-16 mcs. Used by R.A.A.F. Provision for preselection of 6 "spot" frequencies. Transmitter mounts on power supply. Modified version of AT5. Made by A.W.A. in 1943. (picture)

AT22

Transmitter.

AT23

Transmitter. Portable. 3 "Spot" frequencies. Uses "loctal" valves.

AT24

Transmitter. Power output 20000 watts Frequency HF. Used by R.A.A.F. for Meteorological broadcasts.

AT25

Transmitter. Power output 3000 watts. Frequency 200-415 kcs. Used by the R.A.A.F. for NDB. Made by S.T.C Sydney.

AT26MK1

Transmitter. Power output 5000 watts, frequency coverage 1.5 - 12 Mcs. Used by R.A.A.F. Made by S.T.C. in Sydney. (picture)

AT26MK2

Transmitter. Power output 5000 watts. frequency coverage 1.5 - 12 Mcs. Used by R.A.A.F. (modified for SSB use)

AT300

RADAR transmitter. Frequency 200 mcs, uses two VT90 output valves. Used with the AR301 receiver. Made by the P.M.G. in 1943. A copy of the UK made ASV Mk II.

ATR1

Transmitter-receiver. Uses transmitter AT7.

ATR2A

Transmitter receiver. (picture) See ATR2C.

ATR2B

Transmitter-receiver. (picture) See ATR2C.

ATR2C

Transmitter-receiver. Frequency coverage 3 - 7.5 mcs, RT/CW power output 10/15 watts. Battery or AC powered. Used by the R.A.A.F. for ground operations. Made by Radio Corporation in 1942. (picture)

ATR3

Transmitter-receiver. VHF multi channel for aircraft use. Development model only.

ATR4

Transmitter-receiver. Power output 2 watts. Single spot crystal on 6540 kcs.

ATR4A

Transceiver. Frequency coverage 3 - 7 mcs. Used by the R.A.A.F. for air liaison parties. Versions ATR4A and ATR4B. Backpack. Made by Radio Corporation as the RC16B. (picture ATR4A) (picture RC16B)

ATR5

Transceiver. Frequency coverage 4 channels in 3 - 9 mcs. Used by the R.A.A.F. in the Boomerang aircraft. Made by the Radio Corporation. (picture)

ATR7

Transceiver (duplex). Frequency range 30 - 50 mcs. Power output 10 watts. Runs from 24 vdc or 220/260 vac. Used by the R.A.A.F. for short range telephone links. Made by A.W.A. (picture)

ATR8

Transmitter-receiver. Frequency coverage 60 - 66 mcs. For ground use.

ATS10

Transmitter. 10 Kw PEP 2-30 MHz auto tuned transmitter for ISB service supplied by A.W.A to various users including R.A.N. (picture)

AUSTRALPHONE

Transmitter Receiver. Made by A.W.A. in 1955.

AW

RADAR For Air warning. Made by C.S.I.R.O. in 1944.

AWA 50 mcs receiver

Receiver. Frequency range 4.7 mcs - 52 mcs, in 8 bands, superheterodyne. Valves used 956 (RF amp), 956 (mixer), 956 (osc), 6U7, 6U7, 6U7 (IF amps 3.06 mcs), 6G8, 6V6 (AF amps), 6A8 (BFO), 5V4 (rectifier). Made by A.W.A. Described in the A.W.A. Technical Review No. 1 1946 page 89. Unsure of the model number. (picture)

AWA aircraft transmitter-receiver

Transmitter-receiver. Remotely controlled. Frequency range 2.5 - 3.5 mcs, 6.2 - 6.675 mcs, 6 crystal channels, CW and AM, power output 10 watts. Valves used 6U7 (RF amp), 6A8 (mixer), 6U7, 6U7 (IF amps), 6G8, 6J7 (AF amps), 807,807 (modulator), 807 (osc), 807 (PA), vibrator power supply. Made by A.W.A. Described in the A.W.A. Technical Review No. 3 1941 page 105. Unsure of the model number. (picture)    (circuit)

AWA radio compass receiver

Receiver. Superheterodyne receiver, also functions as a radio compass. Frequency range 275 - 1700 kcs, 2.3 -  3.3 mcs, 6 - 7 mcs, in 5 bands. Valves used 6U7 (RF amp), 6A8 (mixer), 6U7, 6U7, (IF amps), 6G8, 6J7 (AF amps), 6A8 (BFO), 6J7, 6J7 (loop modulator), 6G8, 6J7 (visual output). Made by A.W.A. Described in the A.W.A. Technical Review No. 1 1942 page 17. Unsure of the model number. (picture)

AWA oscilloscope 5"P

Oscilloscope. Portable. Can also be fitted with 3" CRT. Made by A.W.A. Described in the A.W.A. Technical Review page 30. Unsure of the model number. (picture)

AWA oscilloscope 5"M

Oscilloscope. For station monitoring. Can also be fitted with 3" CRT. Made by A.W.A. Described in the A.W.A. Technical Review page 30. Unsure of the model number. (picture)

AWA Receiver

Receiver. Frequency range 120 kcs - 20 mcs, using 7 coil boxes, superheterodyne with crystal filter. Valves used 6U7 (RF amp), 6A8 (mixer), 6V6 (osc), 6U7, 6U7 (IF amps 532.5 kcs), 6G8, 6V6 (AF amps), 6A8 (BFO), 6J7 (S meter), 240 vac power supply. Made by A.W.A. Described in the A.W.A. Technical Review No. 4 1939 page 181. One version had two coil boxes plugged into the front panel. (picture)

AWT12

Transmitter. Modified version of AT5 made for US forces.

C143A

Receiver. Used for D/F. Made by A.W.A. (picture)

C1070

Oscillator. Frequency range 100 kcs - 20 mcs, battery operated. Made by A.W.A. Described in the A.W.A. Technical Review October 1936 page 127. (picture)

C2869

Receiver. Made in 1940 by AWA. Uses two plug in coil boxes, 9V4268 for fixed frequency using a crystal, and 3V4268 for HF coverage (5 to 1.4mhz). Valves used were: two 6K7 RF amplifiers, 6L7 mixer, two 6K7 IF ampliers, 6R7 second detector and audio preamplifier, 6F6 audio power amplifier, 80 rectifier. Two other valves used are 6K7 and 6N7. (picture)

C3487

Receiver. HF coverage. Constructed in a square box using a straight dial and battery valves. Part of the Teleradio 3A. Made by A.W.A. in 1940. See 3A.

C5352

CRT Indicator for D/F service with the R.A.A.F. Consists of a desk with CRT installation. (picture)

C5406

Receiver. Made by A.W.A. in 1939. See WS No. 101 and FS6.

C6597

Receiver. See FS8.

C6770

Receiver. Frequency coverage 200 kcs - 30 mcs. Constructed in a steel box with rounded corners and clip on front cover. Uses a 180 degree vernier dial and indirectly heated valves. Internal vibrator power supply. Used by the Army and Coast Watchers. Part of the Teleradio 3BZ transmitter receiver. Made by A.W.A. in 1941. See 3BZ. (picture)

C6940

Receiver. Frequency coverage 100 kcs - 3.1 mcs. Constructed in a steel box with rounded corners and clip on front cover. Uses a 180 degree vernier dial and indirectly heated valves. Requires external power supply. Made by A.W.A. (picture)

C7485

Receiver. Rack mounted receiver. Made by A.W.A. (picture)

C7565

Receiver. Frequency range in seven bands from 500Khz to 22.6 Mhz. Mains input. BFO. Uses magic eye tuning indiactor. Made by A.W.A. in approximately 1939. (front view)    (side view)    (back view)    (cover)    (internal view)   

C7567

Receiver. Later version of the C6940, intended as a communications receiver. Uses miniature valves. Made by A.W.A.

C7733

Receiver. See AR8.

C8388

Receiver. Frequency range 45 kcs - 5.3 mcs, in 6 bands, TRF. Valves used 6U7, 6U7 (RF amps), 6J7 (linear reflex detector), 6J7, 6V6 (AF amps), 5Y3 (rectifier). Made by A.W.A. Described in the A.W.A. Technical Review No. 1 1946 page 89. (picture)

C13500

Receiver. See the AMR100.

C17020

Receiver. Frequency coverage 550 kcs - 1650 kcs, 6 - 18 mcs. Used by the Army as an 6v amenities receiver. Made by A.W.A. in 1945. (picture)

C17350

Receiver. Frequency coverage 550 kcs - 1650 kcs. Used by the Army as an amenities receiver. Made by A.W.A. in 1945.

C50637

Receiver. Frequency coverage 1.6 - 9 mcs crystal locked. Made by A.W.A. in 1946.

C52820

Receiver. Frequency coverage 0.1 - 32 mcs. Made by A.W.A. in 1952. (picture)

C55163

Receiver. 5 bands Made by A.W.A. in 1950. (picture)

C55184

Receiver. Crystal locked single frequency rack mount receiver, used by D.C.A. Receives CW, MCW and RT, in the frequency Range A 200-400kcs, Range B 1.7-4Mcs, Range C 4-7.5Mcs, Range D 7.5-15Mcs,  Range E 15-30Mcs. Uses a crystal and coil unit for each range. IF is 455kcs and has a crystal filter. Crystal oven R5239B may be fitted to some models after serial number 25. Requires 240 volts AC. Usually fitted with Codan unit R55183. Made by A.W.A. in 1952. (picture)   (picture)   (circuit1)   (circuit2)

C55695

Transmitter receiver. See MR10.

C60600

Receiver. See the CR6. Made by A.W.A.

C68304

Synthesiser. See CRH11. Made by AWA.

C68324

Signal processor. See CRH11. Made by AWA.

C68344

Power Supply. See CRH11 and CEH11. Made by AWA.

C68375

Synthesiser. See CEH11. Made by AWA.

C68376

Signal processor. See CEH11. Made by AWA.

C95150

Receiver. See the CR3D. Made by A.W.A.

C95160

Receiver. See the Reception Set R5232. Made by A.W.A.

C95180

Receiver. See the Reception Set R5233. Made by A.W.A.

CA7024

Capacitance Meter. Measures inter electrode capacitance of valves. Range is 0.001 to 2 uuf. Made by A.W.A. Description in A.W.A. Technical Review No. 3 1947 page 279 (picture)   (the CA7024 number may be in error)

CB2

Transmitter. 10 kW MCW dual NDB comprising two transmitters, with a control and automatic changeover rack combined as one assembly with a separate antenna loading coil cabinet. Changeover from worker to standby transmitter occurred on RF power output reduction or failure of the identification keying tone. The transmitters used a pair of 5J 281 valves in push pull and were based on a standard broadcast transmitter design. This unit was supplied to the R.A.A.F by S.T.C Sydney in 1954.    (picture)

CB3

Transmitter. 40 kW PEP manually tuned Transmitter, frequency 2 - 30 mhz, in 3 cabinets, for SSB service, employing in the final stage two 3J 261 valves in push pull Class B operation. Four of these units were supplied to the R.A.N commencing 1956 by S.T.C Sydney.    (picture)

Chronometer, Photocell (Aust) No 1

Muzzle Velocity Chronometer. This device measures the muzzle velocity of projectiles from 70 to 4000 feet per second. It consists of 3 parts: Sky Screen, Counter, Alternator.  The Sky Screen assembly is a portable angle iron beam, that has 2 photocells at a 10 foot distance apart. It is placed beneath the muzzle of a gun and elevated, so that the projectile passes through the optical plane above both lens systems. Contemporary Boulenge designs required the project to pass through 2 wire screens 270 feet apart. Dimensions are 11 feet 4 inches long, 2 feet 7 inches wide, 2 feet 6 inches high and 1300 pounds weight, and requires 230 volts AC 150 watts at 50 cps. The Counter is electronic and has 17 binary counter stages using valves, 15 counters have neon outputs, arranged in 5 columns of three. A table book is used to determine the velocity from the neon count. Dimensions are 3 feet 10 inches high, 2 feet 6 inches wide, 1 foot 6 inches deep, 460 pounds weight, requiring 230 volts AC 320 watts at 50 cps. The Alternator is petrol powered and supplies 230 volts AC 1500VA at 50 cps. Made by CSIR for AMF in 1946. (Sky Screen)   (Counter)

CLH-30J

Transmitter. 30 kW PEP version of CLH40. Supplied to various users including R.A.N & O.T.C. (picture)

CLH-40A

Transmitter. 40 kW PEP 4-27.5 MHz auto tuned transmitter for ISB service employing three parallel 4CX 10000D ceramic tetrodes in the final stage. Supplied by A.W.A to various users including R.A.N. (picture)

Condenser X5-5KV (Aust)

An aerial blocking capacitor used on the WS No. 11 to connect the aerial to a vehicle mounted whip. Used by the Army. in 1943.

Control Unit A3

Control Unit. For transmitter TA-2J-24 used in ground operation. Made by Radio Corp. in 1944.

Control Unit TA2

Control Unit. For transmitter TA-2J-24 used in ground operation. Made by Radio Corp. in 1944.

CR3D

Receiver. Frequency coverage 14 kcs - 30.1 mcs crystal in 12 bands with no gaps. It uses single conversion with an IF of 85 kcs for the 2 bands covering 100 - 630 kcs. It uses double conversion with a first IF of 585 kcs for the lowest band and the other higher bands. Five IF bandwidths. 14 valves. External power supply type H95152 for 120/240 vac or H95151 for 24 vdc. Same as C95150. Made by A.W.A. in 1957. (picture)

CR6

Receiver. general purpose communications receiver. Frequency coverage 2 to 30 mcs in 6 bands. Double conversion, first I.F. 1.8 mcs second I.F. 100 kcs. Variants CR6A and CR6B. Made by A.W.A. 1958 to 1962. (picture)

CRH11

Receiver. General purpose communications receiver, with local and remote control, rack mount. Frequency coverage 2 to 30 mcs. Solid state, synthesiser set by 7 switches, 10s and 1s of mhz, 100s, 10s and 1s of khz, 100s and 10s of hz. RF gain, AGC off, slow, fast, data. Modes CW, FSK, USB, LSB, ISB, AM. Two audio outputs and controls. I.F. 1749.5 kcs. Synthesiser 1C68304, Signal Processor 1C68324, Power supply 1H68344. Aerial 50 ohm input. AC input 240 VAC or 115 VAC, 32 kg weight. Made by A.W.A. in August 1976. (picture)

CEH11

Exciter. Local and remote control, rack mount. Frequency coverage 2 to 30 mcs. Solid state, synthesiser set by 7 switches, 10s and 1s of mhz, 100s, 10s and 1s of khz, 100s and 10s of hz. Modes CW, FSK, USB, LSB, ISB, AM. Synthesiser 1C68375, Signal Processor 1C68376, Power supply 1H68344. AC input 240 VAC or 115 VAC, 32 kg weight. Made by A.W.A. in August 1976. (picture)

Crystal Calibrator Number 10

Frequency range 2 - 10 mcs. Used by the Army. in 1955 for the Wireless Set Number 62. Made by PYE

Crystal Calibrator A2

Part of AR17.


CU-F1

Aerial coupler. See  PRC-F1. Couples the output of a PRC-F1 to an AS-F1 whip aerial. Mounts on the PRC-F1 aerial output. Made by AWA in 1968. (picture)


CU-F1A1

Aerial coupler. See PRC-F1. Couples the output of a PRC-F1 to an AS-F1 whip aerial. Mounts on the side of the PRC-F1. Made by AWA in 1968. (picture)


CU-F2

Aerial coupler. See PRC-F1.Converts 50 ohm input impedance to a Balanced or Unbalanced dipole aerial with impedances from 5 to 7000 ohms. Transmit power can be 10 watts. (picture)

CX1

Transmitter. Navy version of the AT26 Mk1. (picture)

CY10

Transmitter. 10 kW PEP, frequency 2 - 30 MHz auto tuned transmitter in two cabinets. Supplied to R.A.N and O.T.C by S.T.C Sydney circa 1960.

D32

Field Strength Receiver. Made by the Gramophone Company (H.M.V.) (picture)

D6799

Speaker and power supply. Part of the Teleradio 3B. Made by A.W.A. in 1941.

D13503

Speaker for the AMR101. Also part of the Teleradio 3BZ. Made by A.W.A. in 1943.

D13505

Speaker for the AMR100. Made by A.W.A. in 1944.

DAS-3D

Multi coupler 2 - 20 mcs. Made by A.W.A. in 1962.

DISTRESS

Transmitter. Automatic distress signaling transmitter, sealed assembly, can be thrown in the sea and will float. Made by A.W.A. for use in lifeboats and rafts. (picture)

DR101

Transmitter Receiver. Frequency range 1.8 - 3.1 mcs, power output 40 watts. Runs from AC or battery. Made by S.T.C. (picture)

DR106

Transceiver. Frequency coverage 60 - 80 mcs. Power output 20 watts. Battery or AC supplies. Used by the R.N., R.A.N., and U.S.N. Made by Philips Electrical Industries. (picture)

DON-5

Telephone made in 1945.

EF1

Frequency Shift Exciter. Provided high stability FSK drive signals with 850 Hz total shift, to excite associated transmitters. Supplied by S.T.C Sydney to R.A.N, Australian Army and R.A.A.F.

EFM1

Frequency Shift Monitor. Provided means to check the deviation or total shift of the drive output from EF1 Frequency Shift Exciter. Supplied by S.T.C Sydney to R.A.N, Australian Army and R.A.A.F.

ETG1

Transmitter. One channel VHF 32.6 mcs. Made by Electronic Industries in 1946.

EUREKA MK 2

Transmitter. Part of EUREKA/REBECCA system. See A1045.

F1

Battery Charger. See PRC-F1 transceiver. Made by A.W.A. in 1968.

F242

Distortion and Noise Meter. See A70542.

FA51920

Signal and Sweep Generator 2 mcs, for FM IF alignment. Made by A.W.A. (picture)

FA51931

FM Modulator 38 - 166 mcs. Made by A.W.A. in 1956.

FA96068

Signal Generator. FM/AM modulated, covering the range 3 - 14 mcs, deviation +/- 100 kcs. For IF alignment. Made by A.W.A. Described in A.W.A. Technical Review No. 3 1947 page 289 (The model number may be in error). (picture)

Flying Doctor Radio

Transmitter-receiver. Frequency range HF. Battery powered. Made by A.W.A. Described in A.W.A. Technical Review No. 5 1941 page 195 (picture)   (circuit)

FJ52856

Transmitter Receiver. FM low band. Made by A.W.A. in 1950.

FJ54448

Transmitter Receiver. Frequency coverage 80 - 85 mcs FM. Made by A.W.A. in 1950. Base station.

FORESTPHONE FP-1

Transmitter receiver. See N63609.

FS2

Transmitter receiver. Type J4935 using type J4933 transmitter receiver on 3 mcs. Backpack using dry batteries. Three valve transmitter crystal locked. RT emission of 100mW. Four valve superheterodyne receiver crystal locked with a 460 kc IF. Eight foot collapsible "fish rod" aerial range is 5 miles. Thirty foot long wire aerial range is 10 miles. Made by A.W.A. in 1939. (picture)   (picture)   (picture)

FS6

Transmitter Receiver. Type J5780. Similar to the WS No. 101 but higher transmitter power. Frequency coverage 4.2 - 6.8 mcs (3.1 - 5.1 mcs, or 4.8 - 7.5 mcs may be substituted). Transmitter is type J5277 using 3 valves and has internal morse key. Emission CW is 8 watts and using rod aerial range is 25 miles. Emission RT is 4 watts and using rod aerial is 12 miles. Receiver is type C5406 is a 5 valve superheterodyne and has a 460 kcs IF. Case is type J5775. Aerial type "A" is 5 brass rod sections, each 3 foot long. with a 4 spoke capacity hat. The second aerial is a flexible cadmium plated "fish rod" type R3715 of 9 feet length. Power supply type H6439 is a 6 volt DC vibrator supply. Used by the Indian Army. Made by A.W.A. in 1939. (picture)   (picture)   (receiver circuit)   (sender circuit)   (power supply circuit)

FS8

Transmitter Receiver. Type J6599. Frequency coverage 1.875 - 5 mcs. Four valve transmitter type J6596 has 2 channels and each has a variable master oscillator and 2 crystals. There is a slide out morse key. Emission CW of 60 watts gives a range 100 miles. Emission RT of 25 watts gives a range 40 miles. Seven valve receiver has 2 channels and is a type C6597 superheterodyne. Aerial is a type R3715 nine foot long cadmium plated rod. Power supply type H6598 is a 12 VDC genemotor supply. Intended for mobile military use in trucks, tanks, and armored cars. Made by A.W.A. in 1939. (picture)   (picture)

FS9A

Transmitter Receiver. Backpack using internal dry batteries. Frequency coverage 8.3 - 9 mcs. Transmitter uses 1 valve and provides RT emission of 0.3 watts giving a range of 3 miles. Superheterodyne receiver using 4 valves. Aerial consists of 8 aluminium tubular sections each 9 inches long, making a total of 6 feet. Intended to be used by forward Army units or artillery. Type J6563 made by A.W.A. in 1939. (picture)

FS9B

Transmitter Receiver. Backpack using internal dry batteries. Frequency coverage 8.3 - 9 mcs. Transmitter uses 2 valves and provides RT emission of 0.3 watts giving a range of 3 miles. Superheterodyne receiver using 4 valves. Aerial consists of 8 aluminium tubular sections each 9 inches long, making a total of 6 feet. Intended to be used by forward Army units or artillery. Type J6564 made by A.W.A. in 1939. (picture)

FS9C

Transmitter Receiver. Backpack using internal dry batteries. Frequency coverage 8.3 - 8.9 mcs with four "click stops". Transmitter uses 2 valves and provides RT emission of 0.5 watts giving a range of 4 miles. Superheterodyne receiver using 3 valves. Aerial consists of 8 aluminium tubular sections each 9 inches long, making a total of 6 feet. Intended to be used by forward Army units or artillery. Type J6668 made by A.W.A. in 1939. (picture)   (picture)

FS11

Transmitter receiver. Frequency coverage 6.5 - 8.5 mcs. Transmitter uses 2 valves and provides a single crystal channel WT emission of 0.5 watts giving a range of 100 miles with a 30 foot long wire aerial. Superheterodyne receiver using 5 valves with a 460 kcs IF. Uses a 4933A4 satchel and an R3050 morse key. Intended to be used in fighter aircraft or bombers as an emergency radio. Type J6702 made by A.W.A. in 1939. (picture)

GENERATING SET Aust. No. 2 Mk II

Generator. Ford 4 cylinder petrol motor. AC output 5KVA, 415/240 volt 3 phase. Made in 1944. I assume it should be green in colour, not blue. (picture)    (picture)    (picture)    (picture)

GIB

Ionisation tester Made by TRIMAX in 1954.

GRC-F2

Transmitter receiver. This is a PRC-F1 in a vehicle mounting or as a ground station. See PRC-F1. Made by A.W.A. in 1968. (picture)

GRC-F4

Transmitter receiver. This is a PRC-F3 in a vehicle mounting or as a ground station. See PRC-F3. Made by A.W.A.

H4289

Power supply. This is intended for aircraft to power the "10 WATT AERIAL MOBILE TRANSMITTER" type J3244. t is a vibrator type. Made by A.W.A. (case) (picture) (picture) (picture) (picture)

H5781

Power supply. See WS No. 101.

H6439

Power supply. See FS6.

H6499

Power Supply. See 3B receiver.

H6598

Power supply. See FS8.

H7528

Power Supply. Vibrator type, 6VDC in, 165VDC 30ma output. Used in crystal calibrator A8089. Made by AWA. (circuit)

H7734

Power Supply. See AT5 and AR8.

H13501

Power Supply. See AMR101.

H50638

Power Supply for C50637 receiver. Made by A.W.A. in 1946.

H55683

Power Supply for bench testing two way radios. Input 240 vac, output 6/12 vdc. Has a speaker and HV power supply. Made by A.W.A. (picture)

H59658

Power Supply. For carphone, made by AWA. (circuit)

H59672

Power Supply for bench testing two way radios. Input 240 vac, output 6/12 vdc. Has a speaker and HV power supply. Made by A.W.A. in 1958. (picture) (circuit)

H95151

Power Supply for CR3D receiver for 24 vdc. Made by A.W.A. in 1957.

H95152

Power Supply for CR3D receiver for 120/240 vac. Made by A.W.A. in 1957.

HC-11

Transmitter receiver. Skyrover. Used 2 valves, 12 and 28vdc versions. Controls on the front, or HC-11-R version was remote controlled. Made by A.W.A. in 1966.
(picture)

Height Indicator Mark 1

Altimeter. Two units, an FM transmitter and a receiver, also uses two aerials and an indicator. Made by S.T.C. for torpedo bombers. (picture)

H-F1

Headset. See PRC-F1. Made by AWA in 1968. (picture)

H-F2

Handset. See PRC-F1. Made by AWA in 1968. (picture)

IFF Mk 3

Transmitter receiver. Frequency 157 - 187 mcs.

IFR500

Test Set used by the Army.

J23

RADAR Used for air warning. Made by C.S.I.R.O. in 1942.

J3244

Transmitter. This is a small transmitter intended for aircraft. It is called the "10 WATT AERIAL MOBILE TRANSMITTER". It uses an 807, 6L6, 6A6, and type 42 valves. Constructed in a round cornered case. The knobs are labeled OSC, METER, PA. The METER knob selects OFF, OSC, PA, SUMOD, MOD. It uses the H4289 power supply. Made by A.W.A. (case) (picture) (picture) (picture) (picture)

J3908

Transmitter. Uses a separate tuning unit. Part of the Teleradio 3A. Made by A.W.A. in 1940. See 3A.

J3922

Transmitter. Power output 1000 watts CW. Frequency 2.5-20 mcs. Four rack modules. Made by A.W.A.

J4616

Transmitter. See WS No. 101.

J4933

Transmitter Receiver. See FS2.

J4935

Transmitter Receiver backpack kit. See FS2.

J5277

Transmitter. See FS6.

J5385

Transmitter. Power output 500-750 watts CW, MCW. Frequency 365-530 kcs, 5-20 mcs. Used by the R.A.N. and Merchant Navy. Three pre-selected frequencies. One tall rack. Made by A.W.A. (picture)

J5405

Case. See WS No. 101.

J5407

Transmitter Receiver. See WS No. 101.

J5775

Case. See FS6.

J5780

Transmitter Receiver. See FS6.

J6563

Transmitter Receiver. See FS9A.

J6564

Transmitter Receiver. See FS9B.

J6596

Transmitter. See FS8.

J6599

Transmitter receiver. See FS8.

J6668

Transmitter Receiver. See FS9C.

J6702

Transmitter Receiver. See FS11.

J6726

Signal Generator. Frequency range 0.1 - 30 mcs. Made by A.W.A. in 1944. (picture)

J6798

Transmitter. Part of the Teleradio 3B. Also uses the J6847 aerial coupler. Made by A.W.A. in 1941. See 3B.

J6800

Transmitter. Part of the Teleradio 3B.

J6847

Aerial coupler. Used with the J6798 transmitter. Part of the Teleradio 3B. Made by A.W.A. in 1941. See 3B.

J7731

Transmitter. See AT5.

J7732

Aerial Coupler for AT5 transmitter. Made by A.W.A. in 1943.

J8871

Transmitter. Power output 10 Kilowatts. Long range. Four racks. Produced for the US forces for "reverse lend lease". Made by A.W.A. (picture)

J8992

Aerial Coupler for 3B transmitter. Made by A.W.A. in 1941.

J50062

Transmitter. Frequency coverage HF, with 6 crystal channels. Uses 807 output valve, constructed in heavy steel box with rounded corners and clip on front cover. Internal vibrator power supply. Part of the Teleradio 3BZ. (Sometimes the transmitter is referred to as the 3BZ). Made by A.W.A. in 1942. See 3BZ. (picture)

J50068

Transmitter. Same as AT21 and similar to the AMT150.

J59651

Transceiver. Same as MR10. Used as an FM mobile two way radio for taxis and similar. Frequency coverage, 2 channels in the range 70-85mcs and 156-170 mcs. Made by AWA. (transmitter circuit)   (receiver circuit)

K132

Test Set for EUREKA ground beacon.

K200D

Power supply for Muirhead Countant Amplifier 2GS 24 V 20A 1966

K/CR/11

Receiver. See AR7.

K/CR/12

Receiver. Frequency covers 4 amateur bands to 50 mcs, normally 40, 20, 10, and 6 meters. It may be optionally fitted with the 80 meter band, or other bands if required. Uses a turret for band changing. The RF amplifier is a 6J6 dual triode with grounded grid. The mixer is an ECH35 with a 1.9 mcs IF. Has a noise limiter, BFO, S meter, and voltage regulator. Uses 10 valves. Made by Kingsley. (picture)   (picture)   (circuit)

KF/5CR

Receiver. Covers the broadcast band and 4 short wave bands, 19, 25, 31, 40 meter bands. Uses 6 valves. Made by Kingsley. (picture)   (circuit)

KF/C610

Converter. Also known as KF/C6. Converts the 6 meter band to a short wave receiver. Use two valves, 6AK5 and ECH35. Output on 10.7 mcs. Made by Kingsley. (picture) (circuit) More information here...

KF/HB

Tuning unit. HiFidelity. Covers the broadcast band. This is a tuning unit and dial, suitable for using in a broadcast band receiver. Available in a kit with chassis and IF coils. Made by Kingsley.

KF/JB

Tuning unit. Junior. Covers the broadcast band. This is a tuning unit and dial, suitable for using in a broadcast band receiver. Available in a kit with chassis and IF coils. Also available as KF/JBR incorporating an RF stage. Made by Kingsley. (picture) (picture) (circuit)

KF/JD

Tuning unit. Junior. Covers the short wave band. This is a tuning unit and dial, suitable for using in a short wave receiver. Available in a kit with chassis and IF coils. Also available as KF/JBR incorporating an RF stage. Made by Kingsley.

KFT

Tuning unit. Covers the broadcast band. This is a tuning unit and dial, suitable for using in a broadcast band receiver. Available in a kit with chassis and IF coils. Available as a 4/5 valve model, a 2/3 valve Reinartz model, and a 3/4 valve model. Made by Kingsley.

KF/VFO

Oscillator. A variable frequency oscillator for amateur use. Covers 80, 40, 20, 10, and 6 meters. Uses 4 valves. Made by Kingsley. (picture)   (circuit)

KINGSLEY "WALKIE TALKIE"

Receiver. A small portable battery powered 4 valve radio. Covers the broadcast band. Available in a kit. Made by Kingsley. (picture)    (circuit)

K/S9

Amplifier. Used to match the aerial to a receiver and improve signal to noise. Has a 6 and 10 meter coil box. Uses 1 valve. Made by Kingsley. (picture) (circuit) More information here...


KY-F1A1

Morse key. See PRC-F1. Made by AWA in 1968. (picture)

LAND ROVER "G"

Power Box FFR. Distribution Box for 3/4 ton LAND ROVER made in 1985.

LW/AW

RADAR. Light Weight Air Warning. Frequency 200 mcs. Made by C.S.I.R.O. in 1946. (picture) Aerials made by N.S.W.G.R. (picture)

LW/AWH

RADAR. Same as the LW/AW but with Height indication. Frequency 1175 - 1250 mcs.

LW/GCI

RADAR. Light Weight Ground Controlled Interception. Frequency 209 mcs. (picture) Aerials made by N.S.W.G.R. (picture)

M52215

Test set. Used for testing the BC-456 modulator which is part of the US signal corps SCR-274N Command airborne radio used in 1940. Made by A.W.A. (picture)

MAST 27

Telescopic mast made in 1964.


M-F1

Microphone. See PRC-F1. Made by AWA in 1968. (picture)

Microphone Hand No. 3

Used on the WS No. 11 Used by the Army. in 1943.

Morse Key Type "F"

A copy of the English "bathtub" key. Made by Radio Corporation. (picture)

MR-10

Transmitter receiver. Two versions, frequency 70-85 mcs and 156 - 170 mcs FM. Made by A.W.A. See J59651.

MT2

Frequency Translator. Provided the final output frequency drive signal for its associated transmitter. Usually in the station control room, the SSB signal was derived at 100 KHz from the station frequency standard and then mixed with 3 MHz to provide a 3.1 MHz drive which was then distributed to the transmitters. The MT2 was normally included in the transmitter or located adjacent to it, and took the 3.1 MHz drive, mixing it with the output of a crystal oscillator to excite the transmitter at the final radiated frequency. It included a phase changing variometer to permit the application of overall RF feedback to reduce intermodulation distortion. Manufactured by S.T.C Sydney. (picture)

MT-F2

Mounting tray. See PRC-F1. Used to mount the PRC-F1 in vehicles. (picture)

MT-F3

Mounting tray. See PRC-F1. Used to mount the power supply of the PRC-F1 in vehicles. Bolted to MT-F2.

MT-F4

Mounting tray. See PRC-F1. Used to mount the CU-F2 aerial coupler of the PRC-F1 in vehicles. Bolted to MT-F2.

MTR1 Mk 2

Transmitter receiver. Frequency coverage, transmitter 2 - 10 mcs, receiver 0.525 - 30 mcs. Used by the Army. Made by PYE Melbourne in 1966. (There is also an MTR1 used by the Navy, different physical layout).

MTR10/120 DP

Transmitter receiver. FM VHF Transmitter receiver produced by S.T.C Sydney circa 1953 for the Public Radiotelephone Subscribers Service, allowing private motor vehicle access to the public switched telephone network.

MTR 12/122

Transmitter receiver. FM VHF Transmitter receiver made by S.T.C Sydney. A boot mount transceiver in the frequency band 70 - 85 MHz with in an RF output power of 10 Watts FM, twin tetrode in push pull.

MTR25/121

Transmitter receiver. FM VHF Transmitter receiver made by S.T.C Sydney in 1961. Available in two bands 70-85 MHz and 156-174 MHz and was the last all valve design produced by this company. (picture)

MTR 25/131

Transmitter receiver. FM VHF Transmitter receiver made by S.T.C Sydney. An under dash mount model incorporating a fully transistorised receiver and transistors in the oscillator and frequency multiplier chain and a QQE03/10 (10 Watts driver) and a QQE03/20 (25 Watts Twin Tetrode power amplifier in push pull) which operated in the frequency bands 70 - 85 MHz or 148 - 174 MHz with an RF output of 25 Watts FM.

MXF2

Morse Adapter. Made in 1972.

N50210

Transceiver. See SKYPHONE.

N61355

Transceiver. The Teleradio 60A is a hybrid AM maritime HF transciever. It covers 2 to 10mhz in 2 bands. The transistorised receiver, has variable tuning and also has 5 crystal locked positions. The transmitter has 5 cryatsal locked positions, and uses 2 valves, 12BY7 and 6883 (12 volt version of the 6146). It was made by AWA about 1970. (picture)  (circuit1)   (circuit2)   (circuit3)

N63609

Transmitter receiver. Called a FORESTPHONE FP-1. Single channel crystal locked, 2 to 5 mhz. Solid state, about 5 watts AM output, uses whip or long aerial, intened for vehicle or portable use. Runs from 12 volts DC. Made by AWA. (picture) (picture) (picture) (circuit)

No. 10

Crystal Calibrator. Used for calibrating WS No. 62. Frequency coverage 1.5 - 10 mcs.

OA-F1

Test Set. Used for testing radios A510, GRC-106, PRC-F1, PRC-25, PRC-77, and RT-524. In one case, it contains a HF signal generator, attenuator, dummy load, meter and adapter cables. Made in 1972. (picture)

OTC-5H

Generator 2 KW Used with WS No. 153 made in 1946. US made "ONAN" generator.


P5966

Control unit for a receiver. Made in 1962 by AWA. (circuit)

PP-F1

Power Supply. See PRC-F1. Voltage input can be 20 to 40 VDC. Voltage output is 27.5 VDC to power the transceiver, and charge the its internal battery. Made by AWA in 1968. (picture)

PRA1

Panadaptor for B40 receiver. Made in 1955.

PRC-F1

Transmitter receiver. Army backpack. Frequency coverage 1000 - 11999 khz in 1 khz steps, CW, AM, or SSB, 1 watt or 10 watts output. Requires a 28VDC rechargeable internal BB-F1 battery. Normally uses an AS-F1 whip aerial, with a CU-F1 or CU-F1A1 whip coupler. The CX-F15 adapter cable allows a H-233/PRC headset and KY-116 leg morse key to be used. When fitted with the MK-F7 Conversion Kit, it can be used as a ground station or with MK-F8 it can be mounted in a vehicle, and is called a  GRC-F2 in this configuration. Uses the MT-F2, MT-F3, & MT-F4 mounting tray. When vehicle mounted, uses the whip sections MS-116A, MS-117A, MS-118A sections and the AB652/VR mast base. For ground use, the CU-F2 aerial coupler is connected to an AS-F2 dipole aerial supplied with a feeder in a CW-F2 canvas webbing bag. Uses the PP-F1 power supply. Made by A.W.A. in 1968. (PRC-F1)   (temporary station)   (permanent ground station)   (vehicle station)   (accessories)   (accessories)

PRC-F3

Transmitter receiver. See PRC-F1. Same as PRC-F1 but with updated electronics, particularly the frequency synthesiser. Can also use the AN/GRA-71 code burst keyer and a NAGRA tape recorder. Also the KE-8 burst code keyer. Made by A.W.A. in 1975.

PRC-F1 Test kit

Test kit. See PRC-F1. A suitcase containing cables, power supply, and several units, for testing the PRC-F1. (picture)

PTM

Control system. Pulse Time Modulated Control System.

R20

Receiver. See C55184.

R25

Receiver. Fixed channel receiver, covering 190kcs to 30mcs, in 1 to 4 channels. Normally fitted with 1 channel. Requires separate tuning heads for each channel, and each head has a separate aerial input. There are 5 tuning heads: 190-430kcs, 1.6-5mcs, 5-15mcs, 10-20mcs, 20-30mcs. Can receive AM, FSK, SSB modes. Remote or local control. Rack Mounted. requires a 50VDC power supply. Made by Philips as Type 1596D in 1965 for DCA as Type Y5/808. (picture)     (circuit)

R163

Receiver. Communications receiver covering 540 kcs - 22 mcs. Used by the US forces. Made by Philips Electrical Industries. (picture)

R1862

Oscillator. Frequency range 50 kcs - 21 mcs, mains operated. Made by A.W.A. Described in the A.W.A. Technical Review October 1936 page 127. (picture)


R3715

Aerial. See WS No. 101 and FS6.

R5239

Crystal Oven. Fitted to C55184 crystal locked receiver. Made by A.W.A.

R6673

Oscilloscope. Frequency range 40 cs - 12 kcs. Portable. Made by A.W.A. Described in the A.W.A. Technical Review No. 3 1941 page 119. (picture)    (circuit)

R6795

Crystal calibrator. Provides 100kcs and 1mc harmonics, in the range 100kcs to 20mcs. Operates from 240 volts AC . Made by A.W.A. (picture)

R7003

Signal Generator. Made by A.W.A. in 1945

R7077

Beat Frequency Oscillator (audio signal generator). Frequency coverage 10 - 13500 cps. Made by A.W.A. in 1944. (picture)

R7490

Signal Generator. Made by A.W.A. (picture)

R7647

Wavemeter. See Wavemeter Class "C" No. 1

R55183

Codan Unit. Used for noise control of receiver C55184. Made by A.W.A. in 1952. (picture)   (circuit)

RA915

Receiver. Crystal locked, 4 channel, fixed frequency 2 - 30 mcs. Made by RACAL (North Ryde) in 1970s.

RA7915

Receiver. Crystal locked, 1 or 6 channel, fixed frequency 0.04 - 30 mcs. Made by RACAL (North Ryde) in 1972 - 1976.

RA7943

Receiver. Crystal locked, 12 channel, fixed frequency 0.04 - 30 mcs, with a carrier and a modulation meter. Used for Broadcast monitoring. Made by RACAL (North Ryde) in 1972 - 1976.

RAVEN

Transmitter receiver. Army backpack. HF (RT-F100) and VHF (RT-F200, PTR4400U) models. Made by PLESSEY in Moorebank, Sydney in 1999. Taken over by SIEMENS.

RB1

Beacon. Responder beacon for frequency 176 mcs. Ground use.

RC7C

Transmitter receiver. See ATR2A.

RC7D

Transmitter receiver. See ATR2B.

RC7E

Transmitter receiver. See ATR2C.

RC8

Transceiver. Frequency range 3 - 10 mcs, power output 10 watts. Used by the R.A.N. Made by Radio Corp. (Astor) in 1942. (picture)

RC16

Transmitter receiver. See ATR4.

RC16B

Transmitter receiver. See ATR4B.

RC25

Aerial tuner for RC8.

RC58

Power supply and rack that holds a Bendix TA-2J-24 transmitter as a ground station for Catalina flying boats. (picture)

RC68

Power supply (Type K) for RC7D (ATR2B) Input 240 VAC. Made by Radio Corp. in 1942.

RC68A

Power supply (Type K1) for RC7E (ATR2C) Input 240 VAC. Made by Radio Corp. in 1942.

RC72A

Power supply (Type J) for RC7D (ATR2B). 12 VDC Made by Radio Corp. in 1942.

RC72B

Power supply for RC8. Made by Radio Corp. in 1942.

RC73D

Receiver. Same as the AR17 Receiver.

RC78

Remote control for RC8.

REBECCA MK 2

Receiver. Part of EUREKA/REBECCA system. See A1045.

Reception Set No. 1

Receiver. General purpose communications receiver 0.138 - 25 mcs. Used by the Army in 1942. Army version of the AR7. Black front panel.

Reception Set No. 4

Receiver. Frequency range 1.2 - 20 mcs. General purpose communications receiver used by the Army in the SWPA. AC or battery operation. Made by Philips Electrical Industries Sydney. (picture)

Reception Set No. 8C

Receiver. Frequency coverage 1.8 - 26 mcs. A variant of the AMR100, and used by the Army. with the the WS No. 153 Made by A.W.A. in 1950. (picture)

Reception Set No. 8D

Receiver. Same as the AR7 but with Dutch language front panel.See AR7.

Reception Set No. R5222

Dual diversity receiver. Construction in one 19" rack. Frequency range 1.6 mcs to 30 mcs in 4 bands, using coil sets. Used for teleprinter service and FSK, 850cps shift. Made in 1957. EMEI E500. (picture)

Reception Set No. R5223

General purpose receiver. Modular construction in a cast, watertight case. Frequency range 1.5 mcs to 30.5 mcs in 29 bands. Similar to the Collins 51J3 receiver. Used by the Army. Made in 1961 by T.C.A. in Adelaide. (picture)

Reception Set No. R5232

Dual diversity receiver. Construction in two 19" racks. Frequency range 1.6 mcs to 30 mcs in 4 bands. Used for ISB service. Made in 1960 by A.W.A. as the C95160. EMEI E650. (picture)

Reception Set No. R5233

Dual diversity receiver. Construction in two 19" racks. Frequency range 1.6 mcs to 30 mcs in 4 bands. Used for teleprinter service and FSK. Made in 1960 by A.W.A. as the C95180. EMEI E660. (picture)

Reception Set Type TS100D

Receiver. See AR21.

Remote Control Unit A

Used on the WS No. 11 to control it at a distance. It has a morse key and buzzer, and connections for microphone and headphones. It also has Line terminals so it can be connected to an exchange. Used by the Army. in 1943.

Remote Control A11

Used with the AR17 receiver.

Remote Control F

Used with WS No. 22. Made by Radio Corp. (picture)

Remote Control H

Used with WS No. 153. Made by A.W.A. in 1946. (picture)

Remote Control L

Used with WS No. 62. Made in 1955.

RFC1

Frequency Shift Converter. Army version of AFSR-2 Frequency Shift Converter. (see AFSR-2) A total of seven of these equipments were supplied to the Australian Army in 1954 by S.T.C Sydney.

RX3A

Adaptor. Dual Diversity Adaptor type Y10D/500546 to allow two AR7 receivers to be controlled by a single exact local oscillator frequency. It consists of a 4 channel xtal oscillator and amplifier feeding a local oscillator signal to the two AR7's in lieu of their own local oscillators. It is in a 19" rack or free-standing box. The xtals could cover the range from 1.5 to 32 Mc/s (fundamental or harmonics). The RX3A has 5 valves and it's own 240v power supply and was made by Pye.

RX6

Adaptor. Type Y10D/500533 is a cathode follower to feed the 455 kc IF signal from the AR7 to an FSK Adaptor. It is in a small metal box with RAAF printed on it and a 6AU6 valve on the side and was mounted on the back of the AR7 chassis. (picture)

SC-CD-136-43

Receiver built for U.S. Army. See AMR101.

SC-CD-312-44

Receiver built for U.S. Army. Also called AMR300 see A679-K.

SCR-211 (Aust.)

Frequency meter. This is an American made SCR-211 (BC-221) with an Australian made power supply fitted into the battery box. The Power supply is 240vac and 12vdc (using a vibrator), and has one multi pin plug on the chassis behind the battery door. There are 2 power cables inside, a 240 volt cable, and a 12vdc cable. Just plug in the appropriate one. The original nameplate has been replaced with one that says SCR-211 (Aust.).

SHD

RADAR Shore Defence. Made by C.S.I.R.O. in 1941.

Signal Generator Type "C" (Aust.)

Same as R7490

SKYPHONE

See VC-10.

SKYROVER

See HC-11.

SRA-34

Power supply. AC input. "Provides all operating voltages for a medium power radio transmitter". Tropicalised. Made for the US forces. Made by Transmission Products (Sydney). (picture)

SS90

Transmitter receiver. Labelled A.W.A. but made by RACAL (North Ryde). See TRA7928.

SS220

Transmitter receiver Frequency range 2 - 12 mcs, 6 channels. Made by A.W.A.

ST-F1

Harness. See PRC-F1. Made by AWA in 1968. (picture)

Stromberg Carlson

Amenities Set Receiver. See 5V15

SWITCHBOARD

Used with the Telephone "L" tropicalised. Made by MacKenzie Holland of Melbourne. (picture)

SVC100L/110

Transmitter. Power output 100 watts. Frequency coverage 2 - 20 mcs. Transportable with carrying frame. Used by the R.A.N. and U.S.N. Made by Philips Electrical Industries. (picture)    (picture)

TA2J24

Transmitter. HF Used a BENDIX TA2 transmitter.

Telephone "L" (Aust.) No. 2

Field Telephone used by Army. in SWPA. Made by Standard Telephones and Cables. (picture)

Teleradio

Transceiver. See 1, 3A, 3B, 3BZ, 60A.

TELS 21

RADAR. Remote Presentation Project.

TRA7928

Transmitter Receiver. frequency 2 - 10 mcs, power output 25 watts, SSB. Used for marine, Royal Flying Doctor Service, land mobile. Made by RACAL (North Ryde) in 1972.

TS100

Receiver. See AR21.

TSC1

Test Set. For servicing the AFSR-2 Frequency Shift Converter. Made by S.T.C Sydney.

TW12

Transmitter. US Army version of the AT21.

Type G

Power supply. For AR8 receiver and AT5 transmitter. Has 2 dynamotors Power input 28 VDC, used by R.A.A.F. (picture)

Type J

Power supply (RC72A). For ATR2B transmitter receiver. Power input 12 VDC Used by R.A.A.F. Made by Radio Corp. (Melbourne) in 1942.

Type K

Power supply (RC68). For ATR2B transmitter receiver. Power input 240 VAC Used by R.A.A.F. Made by Radio Corp. (Melbourne) in 1942.

Type K1

Power supply (RC68A). For ATR2C transmitter receiver. Power input 240 VAC Used by R.A.A.F. Made by Radio Corp. (Melbourne) in 1942.

Type N

Power supply. For AR17 receiver. Power input 110/240VAC or 6 VDC. Used by R.A.A.F.

Type S

Power supply. For AR8 receiver and AT5 transmitter. Power input 110/240VAC, used by R.A.A.F.

Type V

Power supply. For the SCR-522 VHF transceiver. Power input 110/240 VAC. Used by the R.A.A.F. Made by Airzone (1931) Ltd. (picture)

Type W

Power supply. For the BC-624 and AR7 receivers.

Type X

Power supply. For the T1154 transmitter. Power input 240 VAC. Used by R.A.A.F. Made by Airzone. (picture)

Type Y

Power supply. For BC-221 frequency meter. Power input 115/240VAC Used by R.A.A.F.

Type Y1

Power supply. For BC-221 frequency meter. Power input 115/240VAC Used by R.A.A.F. Made by Bland Radio in 1945.

Unit H.T. Vibratory No. 1

Power supply for the Wavemeter Class "C" No. 1. Made in 1942 by A.W.A.

Unit Vibratory No. 3

Power supply for the Wireless Set No. 128. (picture)

V5

Receiver. Amenities use. Made by Australian Sound Systems (Cadet Radio). (picture)   (circuit)

V4268

Plugin coil box for the C2869 receiver.

VAC-1

Transceiver. Frequency range 112 - 122 mcs, AM transmission 200 mw output, 2 channel, 6 miniature valves. Made by A.W.A. Described in A.W.A. Technical Review No. 3 1949 page 195. (picture)  (circuit)

VAN3

Distance Measuring Equipment. Frequency 190 mcs. Made by A.W.A. in 1955.

VAN5

Distance Measuring Equipment transponder. Made by A.W.A.

VC-10

Transceiver. Called a SKYPHONE. Small VHF transceiver for aircraft, uses valves, 14 or 28VDC. Similar to the SKYROVER. Made by AWA. (picture) (picture) (picture)

VCT-1

Valve Tester. Made by Palec Paton. (picture)

VCT-2

Valve Tester. Made by Palec Paton. (picture)

WAVEMETER Class "C" No. 1

Wavemeter. Frequency coverage 1470 - 10260 kcs, used by the Army. Made in 1942 by A.W.A. Type R7647. Uses power supply type Unit H.T. Vibratory No. 1

WELFARE SET

Receiver. Used in Madang. Made by Standard Telephones. (picture)

WS No. 11 (Aust)

Transceiver. Frequency coverage 4.2 - 7.5 mcs. Developed from the British WS No. 11 and made by A.W.A. Not tropicalised. Replaced the WS No. 101. Used by the Army in 1943. (picture)

WS No. 19 Mk 2 (Aust)

Transmitter Receiver. Frequency coverage 2 - 8 mcs, 235 mcs. Used by the Army. Made by A.W.A. in 1943, 1944

WS No. 19 Mk 2/2 (Aust)

Transmitter Receiver. Frequency coverage 2 - 8 mcs, 235 mcs. Used by the Army. Made by A.W.A. in 1954. (picture)

WS No. 22 (Aust)

Transceiver. Frequency coverage 2 - 8 mcs. Used by the A.M.F. Made by Astor after 1942. Tropicalised and waterproofed. Has fully enclosed vernier flick dial, increased transmitter output and class B modulation. Improved 2 vibrator power supply with LP/HP switching, called Supply Units No 1A. Final version of the WS No 22 (Aust) Yellow Band.

WS No. 22 (Aust) Yellow Band

Transceiver. Frequency coverage 2 - 8 mcs. Used by the A.M.F. Made by Astor in 1942. Tropicalised and waterproofed. An interim set with the characteristics of the British WS No 22.

WS No. 62 MK 2 (Aust)

Transceiver. Frequency coverage 1.6 - 10 mcs. Used by the Army. 1955

WS No. 62 MK 3 (Aust)

Transceiver. Frequency coverage 1.6 - 10 mcs. Used by the Army. 1954

WS No. 101

Transmitter receiver. Type J5407. Frequency coverage 4.2 - 6.8 mcs. Three valve type J4616 transmitter has built in key. Emission RT is 0.75 W range 6 miles. Emission CW is 1.2 W range 12 miles. Five valve type C5406 superheterodyne receiver has an IF at 460 kcs. Case type J5405. Vibrator power supply type H5781 from 6 VDC. Two types of aerial; Type "A" five brass rods (3 feet long) with 4 spoke Top Hat, Type "B" collapsible cadmium plated 9 foot "fish rod" type R3715. Used by the Army. in the Middle East (2 man portable). Developed and made by A.W.A. in 1939. Same function as the English Wireless Set Number 1. Replaced by the WS No. 11 (Aust). (station picture)   (front picture)    (transmitter circuit)   (receiver circuit)    (power supply circuit)

WS No. 105B

Transmitter. Army version of the J3922. (picture)

WS No. 108 MK I

Transmitter receiver. Backpack. Frequency coverage 8.5 - 8.9 mcs. IF 455 kcs. Used by the Army. 1941. Developed from the British WS No. 18. Made by Radio Corp. (Astor).

WS No. 108 MK II

Transmitter receiver. Backpack. Frequency coverage 6 - 9 mcs. IF 1600 kcs. Some models had the meter upside down. Used by the Army. in the Middle East. 1941. Made by Radio Corp. (Astor). (picture)   (picture)

WS No. 108 MK III

Transmitter receiver. Backkpack. Frequency coverage 2.5 - 3.5 mcs. IF 455 kcs. Used by the Army in the SWPA. Made by Radio Corp. (Astor) in 1945. (picture)

WS No. 109

Transmitter receiver. Frequency coverage 2.5 - 5 mcs. Contained in one transportable metal box, with mic, phones and cables in the box lid, weighing 77 pounds. Models available were Mk I, Mk II, Mk II*, Mk II**, and Mk III. Transmitter uses three 807 valves and has a slide out morse key. Receiver uses 5 valves (6 in the Mk II**). The power supply (up to Mk II) uses a 6 volt synchronous vibrator. The Mk II* uses a non synchronous vibrator and a selenium rectifier (or 4 valves). Power supply is in a metal box with lid and weighs 45 pounds. Aerial was a 9, 12, or 15 foot vertical rod. Four horizontal top spokes were optional. Alternate aerial was a 25 foot T or L horizontal wire. Using the 9 foot rod aerial, range was 35 miles on WT and 25 miles on RT. Used by the Army. in 1941. Same function as the English Wireless Set No. 9. Made by S.T.C. (picture)   (transmitter circuit)   (rx circuit)    (psu circuit)    (valve rectifier)

WS No. 112

Transmitter, Aerial coupling unit, and Receiver. Army. version of the AT5 and AR8. (picture)   (picture)

WS No. 113A

Transceiver. Army version of the ATR4. Used in Timor.

WS No. 114A

Transmitter receiver. Army version of the ATR2C. Used by Commandos in Timor.

WS No. 122

Transceiver. Frequency range 2 - 8 mcs. Used by the A.M.F. in 1946. Same as the WS No. 22 but uses class B modulation and tropicalised. Also able to operate with a crystal. Uses Aerial Coupling Unit J and Remote Control F. (picture) (picture)

WS No. 122 Mark 2

Transceiver. Used by the Army in 1955.

WS No. 122 HP

Same as the WS No. 122 but high power version using the RF Amplifier Mk 2. made in 1955

WS No. 128 Mk I

Transceiver. Backpack. Frequency coverage 2 - 4.5 mcs, also has 3 crystal channels. Power output 0.25 watts, AM and CW. Uses 9 miniature valves, IF 1.6 mcs. Designed in 1944 as a tropicalised replacement for the WS No. 108, entered service in 1946. Used by the Army. in Korea. Made by Tasma Radio. Upgraded in 1952 to the WS No. 128 MK II. Also see Unit Vibratory No. 3 (picture, case is re-painted wrong colour)    (picture of front)    (accessories)    (harness)    (circuit)  

WS No. 128 Mk II

Transceiver. Backpack. Frequency coverage 2 - 4.5 mcs, also has 3 crystal channels. Power output 0.25 watts, AM and CW. Uses 9 miniature valves, IF 1.6 mcs. Upgraded version of the WS No. 128. Made by Tasma Radio. Used by the Army. in Korea. Replaced from 1955 by the A510. Also see Unit Vibratory No. 3 (harness)

WS No. 133

Transmitter. Power output 300 watts CW. Also RT and MCW. Frequency 2.5-20 mcs. Used by the Army. in New Guinea and Borneo. Six modules in a large case with local and remote controls. Made in 1942. (picture)

WS No. 153

Transmitter Frequency Range 2 - 20 mcs. Power output 300 watts. Portable, 3 units. Used by the Army. in 1946.  Used with the Reception Set No. 8C receiver, and Remote Control Type H. (picture)   (RF Unit)   (power control unit)   (Rectifier unit)

WS No. 173

Transmitter. Army. version of the AT20. (picture)

WS No. 208

Transmitter receiver. Frequency Range 2.5 - 3.5 mcs. Backpack. Used by commandos in New Guinea. Developed from the WS No. 108 Mk II. Made by Radio Corp. (Astor). (picture)

WS No. 208 Mark 1

Transmitter receiver. Frequency Range 2.5 - 3.5 mcs Used in 1941

WS No. 208 Mark 2

Transmitter receiver. Frequency Range 2.5 - 3.5 mcs Used in 1944

Y50025

Artificial aerial. See A4.

ZC1 Mk1

Transmitter receiver. Frequency coverage 2 - 8 mcs. Made in New Zealand.

ZC1 Mk 2

Transmitter receiver. Frequency coverage 2 - 8 mcs. Made in New Zealand.

ZC8

Transmitter receiver. Frequency coverage 6 - 9 mcs, IF 455kcs. Battery operated backpack. Made in New Zealand in 1942 by Dominion Radio and Electrical Corporation. (picture front)   (picture nameplate)   (picture cover)   (picture side)   (picture back)   (picture accessories)   (circuit 3.3Mb)

References

A.W.A. Technical Review 1935 - 1975
Australian Telecommunications At War, O. F. Mingay, special issue Radio Electrical Retailer, Vol. XXIII No. 16 May 2 1946
Saga of Achievement, Group Captain E.R. Hall, 1978 ISBN 0 9595927 09
Milradio Manual List, Ian O'Toole, 30/4/99

Glossary and Abbreviations

Army. Australian Imperial Forces
AMF Australian Military Forces
AMR American Receiver
AMT American Transmitter
AN/ joint Army Navy nomenclature
AR Australian Receiver
AT Australian Transmitter
ATR Australian Transmitter Receiver
A.W.A. Amalgamated Wireless Australia Pty. Ltd
C.S.I.R. Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research
C.S.I.R.O. Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation.
CW continuous wave
D/F Direction Finding
DME Distance Measuring Equipment
FM Frequency Modulation
HF High Frequency 3 - 30 Mhz
LF Low Frequency 30 - 300 Khz
MCW modulated continuous wave
MF Low Frequency 300 Khz - 3 Mhz
No. number
N.S.W.G.R. New South Wales Government Railways
P.M.G. Post Master General
R.A.A.F. Royal Australian Air Force
R.A.N. Royal Australian Navy
R.N. Royal Navy
RT radio telephony
S.T.C. Standard Telephones and Cables Pty. Ltd.
SCR Signal Corps Radio
TACAN TACtical Air Navigation
SWPA South West Pacific Area
UHF Ultra High Frequency 300 - 3000 Mhz
US United States of America
U.S.N. United States Navy
VHF Very High Frequency 30 - 300 Mhz
WS Wireless Set
WT Wireless Telegraphy

Acknowledgments

Ian O'Toole (many photos and data)
Peter May
Dave Prince
John Piovesan
Alex Koppen
Colin MacKinnon (3BZ photos)
Simon Buxton (C7567 photo)
Charles Darby (A1052 photos)
Kim Briggs (GENERATING SET Aust. No. 2 Mk II, and SVC100L/110 photos)
Mal (C7565 photos)
Donald Bainbridge (HC-11 photo and information)
Albert Alyta (STC mobiles MTR 25/121, MTR 12/122, MTR 25/131)
Michael Kane (Velco AMA)
Brian Johns (ZC8)
Art Lebermann (AEW2)
Rod Reynolds VK3AAR (Dutch AR7, AM200 photos)

Email

robinson at tuberadio.com


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